Some of what you think you know about sex is true, some are just false. Discover interesting myths and the facts about, Sex, STDs and contraception. Click any of the tabs below

  • 1

    Myth: Male circumcision reduces sexual satisfaction

    Fact: There is no relationship between circumcision and reduced sexual arousal or experience. A man who is circumcised can pleasure and be pleasured as much as an uncircumcised man.

  • 2

    Myth: Only men have wet dreams

    Fact: Although wet dreams are more common occurrence in men, many studies have found up to 40% of women who have had or have wet dreams.

  • 3

    Myth: I won’t get pregnant because this is my first time having sex False:

    A woman can get pregnant any time ovulation occurs, even if it’s her first time having sex.

  • 4

    Myth : Using a condom seriously diminishes male sexual pleasure.

    Fact: According to a recent study in the Journal of sexual Medicine, both men and women enjoy sex with condoms just as much as they do without them. So if you’re looking for a hormone-free birth control method, don’t be swayed by the myth that condoms can kill the moment. Check out these pleasure-enhancing options (link to fiesta dotted, ribbed, etc.), and keep a stash at your place. That way, you’ll be prepared if a guy tries to use this fake line to avoid wrapping his member up.

  • 5

    Myth: Women Don’t Watch Porn

    False, People believe that watching porn has always been a guy thing and most porn is marketed towards men—both straight and gay. Nowadays, pornography geared towards women does exist and many women do report enjoying pornography

  • 6

    Myth: I can’t get pregnant if I don’t have an orgasm?

    The pleasure of sex isn’t connected to the science of pregnancy at all. If you have sex without contraception you can get pregnant, whether you enjoyed it or not.

  • 7

    Myth: You can use a condom more than once, if you wash it properly.

    Fact: A condom should NEVER be used twice under any circumstances.

  • 8

    Myth: Baby oil and Vaseline® are okay to use as lubricants with latex condoms.

    Fact: Oil-based lubricants (like baby oil, Vaseline®, handcreams, Crisco) can break down latex and allow STDs/STIs to pass through. Instead, water soluble lubricants like K-Y Jelly®, Glide®, Aqualube®, most contraceptive jellies, saliva, or even plain ol’ water are good lubricants to use with condoms.

  • 9

    Myth: Most women can have an orgasm through vaginal sex only.

    Fact: Only about 30% of women reach orgasm through vaginal sex only. The other 70% need more manual or oral stimulation to achieve orgasms.

  • 10

    Myth: The average penis size is about 5 to 6 inches.

    Fact: According to the Kinsey Institute, the average erect (hard) penis length of U.S. males is between 5 to 6 inches, and average flaccid (not erect, or soft) penis length ranges between 1 and 4 inches.

  • 11

    Myth: Girls don’t masturbate.

    Fact: Girls in fact are curious about their bodies and do masturbate. However on average, guys are more likely to report that they masturbate than girls. Girls might be afraid to engage in or admit to masturbating to the same degree as guys do.

  • 12

    Myth:”Blue balls” is a real medical condition.

    Fact: But . . . not a serious one. The correct medical term for “blue balls” is vasocongestion. This happens when blood builds up in the testicles and/or prostate when a male gets aroused (“turned on”) but doesn’t ejaculate. It is often accompanied by a cramp-like ache and pain or tenderness in the groin area. While this can be uncomfortable, it is not a serious condition and is not an excuse to pressure a partner into sex. There are two ways to get rid of this problem–a guy can masturbate until he ejaculates, or just let the feelings of arousal go away on their own (which they will). It should be noted that girls can have the same pain and discomfort from getting aroused and not having an organsm as well.

  • 1

    Myth: Oral and anal sex are safe alternatives to vaginal sex

    Fact: This is not true. If you are only concerned about preventing pregnancy, then oral and anal sex are safer alternatives than vaginal sex. However, STIs can and are frequently contracted through oral and anal sex.

  • 2

    Having sex with a virgin can cure someone with an STI, including HIV?

    Fact: This practice only puts the other person at the risk of infection. Having sex with a virgin will not cure any sexually transmitted infect including HIV.

  • 3

    Myth: If you get an STD once, you can never get it again.

    FALSE, A lot of STDs can be cured with antibiotics. But once they’re cured, you can get them again. So if you get treated for an STD, your partner(s) should be treated also, otherwise they could give the infection right back to you if/when you have sex with them again. Also test again whenever you have unprotected sex or start having sex with someone new.

  • 4

    Myth: You can’t get STDs from oral sex.

    FALSE, While most STDs are spread through vaginal (penis-in-vagina) and anal (penis-in-anus) sex, unprotected oral sex can also put you at risk for STDs. HPV, gonorrhea, syphilis, herpes, and hepatitis B can all be spread through oral sex while HIV is less likely to be transmitted through oral sex. To protect each other from STDs, it’s a good idea to use condoms for oral sex (that’s what flavored condoms like Fiesta Chocolate and Strawberry are great for!).

  • 5

    Myth: Washing the penis or vagina after sex can prevent STI

    Genital hygiene is important and a good practice, however, there is no evidence that washing the genitals prevents STIs. In fact, women who douche increase their vaginal risk of acquiring STIs.

  • 6

    Myth: Wearing two condoms will give you double protection

    Fact: One condom is enough and when you wear two condoms, the layers rub against each other causing them to break.

  • 7

    Myth: You can get an STI from a toilet seat.

    You get STIs by having sex (vaginal, oral or anal) or by skin-to-skin touching–not from toilet seats.

  • 8

    Myth: You will get HIV or a STI from getting a tattoo or through ear or body piercing.

    Fact: There can be a risk for HIV or another blood-borne infection (like hepatitis B or C) if the instruments used for piercing or tattooing either are not sterilized or disinfected when used from client to client. Therefore, any instrument used to pierce or cut the skin should be used once and thrown away. Ask the staff at the tattoo parlor about their equipment. They should be able to show you what precautions they use and if they won’t then don’t get pierced or tattooed there.

  • 9

    Myth: You can’t get an STI from oral sex.

    Fact: During oral sex, you can give your partner your STI and you can get theirs. Not all STIs are transmitted through oral sex, but some are. For example, if your partner has a cold

  • 10

    Myth: You can’t get an STI if your partner is a virgin.

    Fact: Depending on how your partner defines being a virgin, it is possible for them to have contracted an STI. Your partner might not have had vaginal sex, but may have had oral sex with someone (and still consider themselves a virgin), putting themselves at risk for an STI. Also, there are other STIs (herpes and HPV) that are passed through skin-to-skin contact, even if no penetration has taken place. It is important to discuss with your partner all sexual activity they have participated in and to always practice safer sex

  • 1

    Myth: You can’t get pregnant if you have sex in the water

    Fact: This is not true. Lots of pregnancies have resulted from having sex in pools and hot tubs. Sex in the water does not protect you from getting pregnant as long as the sperm still gets into the vagina

  • 2

    Myth: Contraceptives do not really work.

    Fact: When used correctly, lots of birth control methods are more than 99% effective at preventing pregnancy. But if you don’t use your contraceptive correctly, it won’t work as expected. Some methods, like the IUD and implant are easy to use correctly because they’re placed in your body and work without any help from you. Other methods, like the pill, depend on you to remember to take it every day, or every three months for contraceptive injections. While condoms are 98% effective at preventing pregnancy when used correctly and are also the best way to avoid STDs.

  • 3

    Myth: I can’t get pregnant while breastfeeding

    Fact: Although exclusive breastfeeding tends to postpone ovulation by suppressing the hormones responsible for this. This is not a guarantee to unwanted pregnancy, so relying on this can lead to be disappointing. These days many women combine breastfeeding with baby formula and this increases the chances that ovulation ca occur even when a woman is breastfeeding. If you are breastfeeding, you should preferably use condoms or another contraceptive method if you effectively wish to avoid pregnancy.

  • 4

    Myth: I won’t get pregnant if we have sex standing up or if the woman is on top

    Fact: Although some people believe that having sex in certain positions, such as standing up or woman on-top, will force the sperm out of the woman’s vagina. However sexual positions have no effect on whether or not fertilization occurs. When a man ejaculates, the sperm are deposited well into the vagina. The sperm will begin to move up through the cervix immediately after ejaculation.

  • 5

    Myth: Hormonal contraceptives like the Pill makes you gain weight

    Fact: Weight gain is largely dependent on your diet and the amount of calories you consume or lose over time. Most studies show that the contribution of hormonal contraceptives to weight changes is not usually significant. Some studies have shown that 50% of women report no weight changes while 25% report weight loss of 3-5kg and 25% report weight gain of 3-5kg.

  • 6

    Myth: You have to take the Pill (Levofem) at the same time every day.

    Fact: Despite what you may have heard, taking the Pill at the same time each day does not make it more effective. This common belief is only true if you’re taking the mini-pill (a progestin-only pill for breastfeeding mothers which must be taken at the same time every day), and does not apply to women who take the regular birth control pill, which contains a combination of estrogen and progestin.

  • 7

    Myth: Being on contraceptives for a long time will make it harder to get pregnant later.

    Fact: This might seem hard to believe, but it’s possible to get pregnant as soon as you stop using contraceptives. This holds true for IUDs and especially the pill (Levofem) and other hormonal contraceptives, with the exception of the Sayana Press injection. It can take 3 to 9 months for all of the hormones in Sayana Press to leave your body, but it’s still possible to get pregnant during this time, so don’t count on this period for contraception.

  • 8

    Myth: You shouldn’t get an IUD unless you’ve already had children.

    Fact: Anyone looking for super-effective long acting, no-hormones, contraceptive should talk to their doctor or nurse about getting an IUD—even if they haven’t had a kid yet. The reason for this misconception is that some older forms of the IUD are generally recommended for women with children, since your cervix and uterus are slightly larger after giving birth, but there are newer IUDs like Lydia Sleek which last for 5 years and are smaller and fit better in a womb that has not carried children.

  • 9

    Myth: Your body needs a break from your contraceptive

    Reality: The only reason to take a vacation from your contraceptives is if you’re hoping to get pregnant. Other than that, you can stay on your chosen method of birth control for as long as you want. The only exception: Sayana Press, because it’s advised that women only take it continuously for two years and then take a break for a year or more before starting use again.

  • 10

    Myth: I won’t get pregnant if my partner pulls out before he ejaculates

    False: Pulling out before the man ejaculates, known as withdrawal, is not a foolproof method of contraception. The fluid a man releases prior to ejaculation can already contain sperm. Also, a man may simply not withdraw in time.

  • 11

    Myth: You can’t get pregnant during your period.

    False: It’s not super common, but it’s possible to get pregnant from sex you had during your period. This is because sperm can hang out in your reproductive organs for FIVE whole days, waiting for one of your eggs to come out.

  • 12

    Myth: The best way to avoid getting pregnant is to use a condom.

    Fact: The best way to avoid getting pregnant is though abstinence. Abstinence (not having any kind of sex) is the only 100% effective form of birth control. If abstinence isn’t an option, using a condom in combination with a hormonal form of birth control is a close second. For example, this could be a condom used together with the birth control pill.

  • 13

    Myth: Peeing or douching after sex protects against pregnancy.

    Fact: When a man ejaculates, the sperm travels through the vagina into the cervix, and then into the uterus. Urine is released from the urethra, not from the vaginal opening, so it does not come in contact with sperm. Washing or douching will not prevent pregnancy due to the speed of which semen travels into your cervix and the fact that water can’t reach the uterus. In fact, douching can actually push sperm up farther up into the vagina. Douching also causes an imbalance of healthy bacteria on your vaginal walls and can put you at an increased risk of contracting a vaginal infection.